How to cache stored procedure results using a hash key

There are a lot of different design patterns that lend themselves to creating the shortest path to the data. One of the most efficient is the caching of stored procedure result sets. In order to do this, we need to read the incoming parameters and create a cache key. This cache key is then stored along with the stored procedures result set as a unique identifier representing that combination of the stored procedures parameters. The caveat with this method is that the business requirement needs to allow stale data. There are times where you will need to use values other than the passed in parameters in order to create the cache key. Some examples include datetime data types or keys that are unique (like a customerkey). If the hash that gets created from the parameters is unique, then you will never reuse that dataset again. With this in mind you would even have determine whether the procedure is even cacheable. Another concern to keep in mind is the duration of time you can serve stale data. Maybe 30 seconds, 1 minute, or 1 hour? Any time increment is able to be worked with by clearning the cache tables at the desired interval. Design Let’s look at the basic workflow for how this procedure will work. First of all, we will need to hash all the parameters that are coming into the procedure (unless they are unique in which case we may not be able to cache, or we can possibly […]

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SQL Server Database Optimization Guide

In the troubleshooting guide we went over the different physical bottlenecks that can cause SQL Server slowness and showed how to identify them. In this guide, we’ll drill down one step deeper to help identify the actual settings or queries that are contributing to the bottleneck. By relieving these bottlenecks we will start to see our batch requests / sec increase. While it may seem you will be able to go through this article once, what is more likely is that you will need to continue to iterate through some of these principles multiple times. This is because many times when one bottleneck is relieved, another is revealed. One thing we will not cover much in this article is architecture. Unfortunately this is a much more complex subject. Suffice it to say, either you have it or you don’t. I can’t so much give architecture principles in an optimization guide, but it is probably the single most important factor in determining throughput in a system. Without a good foundation you can only build a house so large. With that said, there are still luckily plenty of optimization techniques we can employ. Missing Indexes The biggest way to be a hero in your organization is to create the missing indexes. This task is simple ever since the introduction of DMV’s. When an index is missing it contributes directly to IO usage, and the higher the IO typically means higher CPU. Each time the SQL Server service is restarted the system tables […]

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Yet Another Temp Tables Vs Table Variables Article

The debate whether to use temp tables or table variables is an old debate that goes back since they were first introduced. The real answer to knowing the difference lies in what is going on under the hood and correlating those specifics to your situation. In this article we’ll touch on (hopefully all) the differences between the two. #Temp tables are just regular SQL tables that are defined and stored in TempDB. The only difference between them and a permanent table is they are not allowed to have foreign keys. You can view the temp tables currently defined via SSMS by going to TempDB and Expanding Temp Tables. Let’s look at a matrix of specific differences then we’ll touch on a few of the key differences below. Item #Temp Tables @Table Variables Can participate in a transaction Writes to Log File Writes only to memory (not disk) Can Qualify for Parallelism Allows creation of statistics Does not affect recompilation Allows nonclustered indexes Allows clustered indexes Can perform SELECT INTO Can access in nested stored procedures Can define globally Can use in user defined functions Can insert from EXEC Allows TRUNCATE Allows ALTER TABLE Scope #Temp tables can be either #locally defined (within the scope of the session) or ##globally defined (within a database). When they are locally defined, the table can be used by whatever is executed within that session (or SPID). In other words, if you define a #temp table in procedure A, then procedure A calls procedure B, […]

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Using Union Instead of OR

Sometimes slow queries can be rectified by changing the query around a bit.  One of these examples can be illustrated when multiple values are compared within a WHERE clause using an OR or IN statement.  Often times, OR can cause a scan against an index or table which may not be the preferable execution plan in terms of IO consumption, or overall query speed. A lot of variables come into play when the query optimizer creates an execution plan.  These variables include a multitude of hardware specs, instance settings, database settings, statistics (table, index, auto-generated), and also the way the query is written.  The one we are changing here is the way the query is written.  As unsuspecting as it may seem, even though two different queries can return the exact same results, the path at which they take can be entirely different just based upon the format of the query. UNION vs OR In most of my experience with SQL Server, the OR is generally less efficient than a UNION. What tends to happen with an OR is it causes a scan more often. Now this sometimes may actually be a better path to take in some cases and I’ll leave that to a separate article but overall I’ve found that touching more records is the biggest cause of slowness. So let’s start our comparison. Here is our OR statement: [cc lang=”sql”] SELECT SalesOrderID, * FROM sales.SalesOrderDetail WHERE ProductID = 750 OR ProductID = 953 [/cc] From this execution […]

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User Defined Functions and Performance

There is definitely a lack of awareness in the SQL world regarding the use of user defined functions and the potential performance hit they can have when using within your queries. Don’t get me wrong, I would love nothing more than to be able to centralize my commonly used code into functions for reuse. In a lot of cases this is possible, however there are specific cases where this can cause a huge performance impact. The Problem The one thing we need to be aware of with SQL is that its efficiency lies in the fact that it deals with data in SETS. Meaning that its power does not come in performing row-by-row operations, rather it wants to retrieve chunks of data and manipulate them as recordsets. Keeping this in mind, you can look out for scenarios where certain operations will cause more of a row-by-row operation and therefore impact performance. The most common no no, is the use of scalar functions within a set based operation. It seems (but I can’t prove) that SQL 2008 has actually made some great strides in being able to deal with these situations, however there will always be a negative impact. First, let’s look at a common scenario. The Test First, let’s deploy this scalar user defined function which calculates the End of month for a given date: [cc lang=”sql”] CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[ufn_GetLastDayOfMonth] ( @pInputDate DATETIME ) RETURNS DATETIME BEGIN DECLARE @vOutputDate DATETIME SET @vOutputDate = CAST(YEAR(@pInputDate) AS VARCHAR(4)) + ‘/’ + CAST(MONTH(@pInputDate) […]

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